Prince Parade


prince parade

Here are some “deleted scenes” that, due to time constraints, didn’t manage to find their way into the original documentary…

“I think that Parade is a fusion of the influences that Prince had and you know he was creating an original style all of his own, still continuing forward to grow as an artist… Years later, I feel that Parade still holds up really well as one of Prince’s best albums. I’d say it’s right up there with Purple Rain and maybe Sign of the Times. All his records have great merits to them but Parade was just… a really great milestone for him. His music will hold up forever, much like the Beatles, you know… just because it’s timeless, and just a really wonderful piece of work. Very creative.”
Matt Fink, Keyboards for Prince and the Revolution, NPG

Prince was in imperious form on his eighth studio album, which was also the soundtrack to his second film Under the Cherry Moon.  Many hard-core fans maintain that Parade stands out as highlight of his career. Recordings for Parade began in Studio 3 of Sunset Sound, Los Angeles, on 17th April 1985 just days before the release of Around the World in a Day. Musicians from his band the Revolution featured prominently, included Wendy & Lisa, Mark Brown, Matt Fink, Bobby Z, and Sheila E.

It was Prince’s first album to use a full orchestra, guided by the superb arrangements of the late Clare Fischer. Fischer had previously worked with Sergio Mendes, The Jacksons and Paul McCartney – amongst others and gave a lush orchestral backdrop to the album. With a blend of jazz and soul, along with distinctly French influences, Parade was a one-off, unlike any other record in the Prince canon – and fully utilised his diverse talents as a singer, producer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and arranger. Exploratory and inventive, it featured multi-layered funk and scorching falsettos over sizzling grooves, electric licks and honking horns.

Parade was Prince’s final album released with the Revolution – and represented a bold new direction which his next album Sign of the Times continued to build on. It points to renewed ambition, musical dexterity and a yearning to cherry pick the best of funk, jazz, pop, soul and R&B and fuse it into an all-new sound.


Contributors:

Matt Fink, Prince and the Revolution, NPG / Brett Anderson, Suede / Bill Oddie, broadcaster / S Endz, Swami / Bobby Friction, broadcaster / Dr Simon Barber, Birmingham Centre for Media & Cultural Research / Brent Fischer, son of Clare Fisher, arranger / Presenter; Ian Camfield /Assistant Producers; S-Endz, Simon Barber / Exec. Producers; Andy Ashton, Mike Walsh


Music Documentaries